INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 1919-1939
THE TREATY OF VERSAILLES, THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS,
THE CAUSES OF WWII

DEPTH STUDY: RUSSIA 1905-1941
TSARIST RUSSIA, RUSSIA IN REVOLUTION, STALIN'S RUSSIA

Throughout your GCSE studies you will be given practice exams. These assessments do not count towards your final GCSE grade, but they are to be conducted as though they were real exams. This is vitally important to give you the practice of not only knowing how to answer the questions, but to do so within the time limits of the exam. It is expected that you will revise for each assessment and if you fall two grades or more below your target grade, then you will be expected to re-sit the assessment within the next two weeks. This will give you a chance to revise again and improve on the areas that you went wrong. This will be conducted after school as there is insufficient time in lessons or at lunchtime to complete it. This is not a punishment and should be viewed as a good opportunity to make progress more quickly, rather than having to wait half a term until the next assessment. Each assessment builds in some questions from the previous topic until you've covered them all.
Assessments covered so far this year:




Advice for assessments and exam
In order to prepare yourself properly for the assessments and the exams you should spend time reading through your notes to ensure that they make sense. Compare them with each of the pages on this wikisite. We have included all the topics that you will need to a basic depth. You should only spend your time revising the topic that you do not know well, if you revise the ones that you do kno, then you're probably wasting your time. Below are a series of helpful work sheets on how to answer each style of question. For this Paper 1 exam there are two styles of question - those refering to a source, and those purely to do with your own knowledge. There are some straight forward things that you must do to "jump through the hoops" that the exam board are setting for you.
SOURCE BASED QUESTIONS
The main question that you can be asked is:
What is the message of this source? This will always be the first question in the exam paper and could be on any of the International Relations topics (i.e. Treaty of Versailles, League of Nations or the Causes of the Second World War). In addition this is a common question to come up on one of the Russian topics as well. Click on the link below to see how to structure your answer.

Why was this source produced? This question will only ever appear in the Russian section. Click on the link below to see how to structure your answer.


Who do you think made this source? This question is also one only for the Russian section. Click on the link below to see how to structure your answer.



Are you surprised by this source? This question is also one only for the Russian section. Click on the link below to see how to structure your answer.
How far does this source prove that...? This question is also one only for the Russian section and is an "iceberg" question - it mentions one topic but expects you to know at least two others that might be to do with the question, but is not shown or mentioned in the source. Click on the link below to see how to structure your answer.


It is essential though that no matter what the source question is, you remember the Golden Rule for sources - you ANSWER THE QUESTION, then support your answer with some EVIDENCE FROM THE SOURCE and further support this with some RELEVANT OWN KNOWLEDGE. If you include two pieces from the source and two aspects of relevant own knowledge you won't go far wrong from the A Grade. It is that straight forward!

NON-SOURCE QUESTIONS
You will be given several questions as options. These will be in the form of a description question, worth 4 marks, an explanation question, worth 6 marks and a judgement question, worth 10 marks. If you follow the instructions on the links below you will find that so long as you have detailed own knowledge on these topics you can't go far wrong. You will get option questions like these on both the International Relations and Russian topics. There are two choices on each and you must pick one on each.


REVISION BOOKLET
How to answer the questions:



International Relations 1919-1939:


Russia 1905-1941:





OCR.JPGPast Exam Papers

SPECIMEN PAPER
2012 June
2012 January
2011 June
2011 January
2010 June (New Specification)
2010 June (Legacy Specification)
2010 January
2009
2008

2007